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Beyond medication: finding services for physical and emotional wellbeing

 
 

Beyond medication: finding services for physical and emotional wellbeing

 
 

When you're living with cancer, medical services will be at the heart of your care. However there are other positives steps you can take before, during and after cancer treatment that can also improve your well-being and your long-term health.  

Thinking of ways of looking after yourself at this difficult time might feel overwhelming, but doing so can help you feel as well as possible during treatment, recover more quickly, and feel good about yourself.

So when you’re ready, you’ll find there is a range of services to be discovered on Cancer Care Map to help improve your wellbeing – not only physically, but also emotionally.  Search by postcode, cancer type, or service type and have a look at what kind of cancer support services are available near you.

Here are just some ideas of cancer support and wellbeing services that you could consider:

Exercise Programmes

Exercise classes or programmes can lift your energy levels and mood – even during cancer treatment. Cancer-specific exercise classes combine activities specially designed with your condition in mind, along with expert advice. Which activities you choose will depend on the type of cancer and your health, so talk to your doctor for advice. 

Diet and Nutrition

Cancer and the effects of treatment can leave you feeling tired and depleted, so your body needs all the nutrients it can get, even if you are not feeling hungry. Classes and support groups run by dietitians offer tips to boost your energy, reduce side effects, and help you heal and feel better more quickly.

Complementary Therapies

Complementary therapies such as massage or reflexology are supportive therapies that can be used alongside your medical treatment to improve your general sense of wellbeing and help you cope better with fatigue, nausea, anxiety and stress. Complementary therapies are not alternative therapies and do not aim to cure cancer.

Body Image

Your illness or the treatments you are undergoing may change your appearance or affect the way you feel about your body. There are courses and workshops to help you cope with side-effects such as hair loss, including make-up sessions and discussion groups. See also Emotional support; wigs and prostheses.

Don’t forget, we love to hear from you too.  So if you’d like to share your experience of finding and using some these kinds of support services, do get in touch.  And of course, if you discover a wonderful charity or activity out there that we don’t know about yet, please let us know.

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